Posted in Climatology, CONFERENCE PRESENTATION, CULTURE, OLD RESEARCH

My Poster for the Library’s Annual Creativity Showcase!

My Poster for the Library’s Annual Creativity Showcase!

The media blurb from Library: “The Mary Livermore Library will be sponsoring the Third Annual UNCP Research and Creativity Showcase on April 15, 2019 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. This event will feature poster and speaker presentations at the newly-renovated Mary Livermore Library. These presentations will highlight the scholarship, research, and creative works of UNCP faculty and staff during the past year.”

Contact me if you want to learn more about my “Meteorology and Myth” project.

Notice: I have updated this article, originally posted on March 5, to include photos from the event on April 15, 2019. I also contributed another poster to the event “Blogging through the GEOG-ing” as per the TLC Directors request,

Next year my library showcase event poster will continue the Meteorology and Myth theme with a new chapter — “A Fair Candlemas”. See you then. 

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Posted in Climatology, COLLABORATIONS, CONFERENCE PRESENTATION, MY PHOTOS, OLD RESEARCH

Posters seen at the Graduate Student Symposium and Open House April 1, 2019

No foolin’ !!! Last night was the Graduate School Symposium and Open House. Current graduate students, potential graduate students and their families enjoyed poster presentations, refreshments and opportunities to discuss our numerous graduate programs. There were a record number 69 posters submitted this year. I had four of my graduate students present posters.

 

You can find more information about the Graduate School linked here:

https://www.uncp.edu/academics/colleges-schools/graduate-school/professional-development/graduate-research-symposium

Just click on a poster to start the slideshow and see details.

The awards were announced after the event. Unfortunately none of my students won, but I still think that they are ALL WINNERS!

https://www.uncp.edu/academics/colleges-schools/graduate-school/professional-development/graduate-research-symposium

 

 

 

 

Posted in MY PHOTOS, OLD RESEARCH, Uncategorized

My entry for the American Meteorological Society T-Shirt design contest 2018

Spoiler Alert: It didn’t win.  I had entered the American Meteorological Society’s annual “T-Shirt Design Contest” last summer. The winner was to be awarded free registration to the Annual Meeting of the AMS that is being held this month. They will  also be selling the shirts — of the winner — at the conference. Here is my design, although I never made it into a real fabric shirt.

I would like to tell you a little bit about how I came to make this design. The t-shirt I designed is just a plain white shirt with black text.  I suppose it could be made in color, but for the purposes of the contest, I just wanted the image to be as clear as possible for the judges.

How did I come up with the idea? I came up with the design from two different ideas. 1) I thought of the National Weather Service map symbols used on the station model on a synoptic weather chart. 2) I also have an interest in Japanese culture and art. (See my current work on Meteorology and Myth.)  The shirt depicts the Japanese kanji for “thunderstorm”.* The Japanese word is raiu.

Background: Kanji symbols are one of the three (maybe four?) methods of writing the Japanese language. There are thousands of kanji symbols. This system differs from our letters in that kanji is a symbolic — or logographic — system. The symbols (or “words” if you will) look like the real things the words represent.

The symbol on the left combines characters for “lightning” on top, with the symbol for “rice field” on the bottom. When the symbol is placed in this context, the symbol no longer means rice field — instead it   means “drumming”.  This is very appropriate! Thunder can sound like the pounding of drums as a thunderstorm approaches the observer. The symbol on the right is the kanji character for “rain”.  Note the symbol includes those four dashes which look rather like rain falling from the flat base of a cloud.  Maybe on to a rice field?

From “The Rising Sky” blog on WordPress.

When you put them together, it “spells” (cough) the Japanese word Raiu – or Thunderstorm. Link: Here is how to pronounce the word “Raiu”.

The other inspiration for my T-shirt design was based on the US National Weather Service symbols used on their synoptic weather charts. Meteorologists place these symbols on a map around a particular station, to represent conditions at a point in time.

Notice that the NWS symbols for thunderstorm, and the various conditions associated with types of thunderstorms storms look like logographic writing.  The basic thunderstorm shorthand symbol is a horizontal line with a perpendicular straight line down on the left side, and a zig-zag line with arrow on the right.  The zig-zag obviously represents a downward lightning path. Perhaps the left line represents the downward rush of rain and cold air, typical of a mature thunderstorm.

Actually, I had thought at first of just using the NWS thunderstorm symbol as the T-shirt design, but then thought the kanji script might be a good conversation starter.  I hope you like my design. Maybe someday I could have the shirt printed out. Do you have any suggestions as to how I might improve the design? Please comment if you want us to order some!

It took the sap about 2:05 to flow through this one.

————————————————————————

*References: I found a WordPress blogger who has posted articles about Japanese kanji script. He also posts interesting articles about Japanese culture. I defer to his expertise here.

https://therisingsky.wordpress.com/2013/09/05/kanji-tip-15-%E9%9B%B7%E9%9B%A8-thunderstorm/

Weather map symbols:

https://www.joshtimlin.com/learning-center?lightbox=dataItem-irgddmlj

https://www.thoughtco.com/symbols-on-weather-maps-3444369

 

Posted in COLLABORATIONS, CONFERENCE PRESENTATION, MY PHOTOS, OLD RESEARCH

Seen at the North Carolina Academy of Science! (The Annual Meeting, March 23-24, 2018. Wake Tech Community College.)

Seen at the North Carolina Academy of Science! (The Annual Meeting, April 2018. Wake Tech Community College).

dennis edgell and julian butler NCAS Meeting 2018
It turns out that “Degree-Days” are neither “degrees” or “days”!

Dennis Edgell (L) and Julian Butler (R).

Dr. Farley and his students NCAS 2018
Dr. Farley would rather “bee keeping”

Dr. Farley and some of his “Kids in the Garden” research.

the big screen IMG_0178

Turned out the entire academy March 24 2018

I also presented a degree-day paper, expanding upon Julian’s pilot study.

I thought it would be attended only by the other presenters. Who knew that the entire academy would be there?

 

Posted in CONFERENCE PRESENTATION, OLD RESEARCH

“Idol Minds: American Perspectives and Misunderstandings of Japanese Idol Culture” (Popular Culture Association Annual Conference, 2018.)

This is a conference paper/Powerpoint slide show that I presented in an Asian Studies session at the Popular Culture Association conference in Indianapolis, IN in March 28-31, 2018. This topic contains material dealing with human sexuality — so “trigger warning” and all that.

Slide1Slide2Slide3Slide4Slide5Slide6Slide7Slide8Slide9Slide10Slide11Slide12Slide13Slide14Slide15Slide16Slide17Slide18Slide19Slide20Slide21Slide22Slide23Slide24Slide25Slide26Slide27Slide28Slide29Slide30Slide31Slide32Slide33Slide34

I received more in-session feedback and discussion than I have with any other topic, at any other conference, at any time.

 

Posted in Climatology, CONFERENCE PRESENTATION, MY PHOTOS, OLD RESEARCH

“Spline Plots for Time Series Visualization of Annual Heating and Cooling Degree-Day Totals in the Climate Divisions of North Carolina.” AGC 2018

This is a poster I presented at the Applied Geography Conference held October 30-November 2, 2018, at my old alma materKent State University.

This was a wonderful trip! I had not been in Kent for almost 20 years. So much has changed … What ever happened to JB’s Down?

DE at AGC in KSU OCT 2018 IMG_0313

The Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center is a wonderful place. The whole downtown Kent area has been transformed in the past few years. Also, I could believe all the new buildings that have been erected on campus.

It was another successful Applied Geography Conference. Much thanks to Dr. Jay Lee, the AGC Director for many years.

some of the current Kent State climatologists at AGC 2018

This is a group photo of current Kent State University Climatology faculty and graduate students.  Oddly absent in the above photo however … is my dissertation adviser Dr. Thomas Schmidlin. Fortunately, I was able to catch up with him at lunch the next day and at the conference keynote address.

Also notable: While I was in Kent I visited Ray’s Place. My friend Bob  (also an old KSU room mate), was kind enough to buy me a late lunch.  I had the “Mofo Burger“.

Mo Fo Burger RAYS PLACE in Kent IMG_0323

Look for me at the next Applied Geography Conference to be held in Charlotte, NC October 2019.

Update: The YouTube video blogger Joe from “Our Earth” provided this introduction to the conference.

Oh man, it rained every day of the conference. I was hoping to get a better look at all the new features of KSU. I still had a great time, but there was never a good day for walking around.

The Sun came out the morning after the conference was over and I was checking out.

Posted in CONFERENCE PRESENTATION, OLD RESEARCH

“Japanese Enka Music and the Five Themes of Cultural Geography” at the AAG Conference in Boston, MA April 03, 2017.

I had not been to an Association of American Geographers (AAG) Conference in about fifteen years! Oh well.  Turns out it was a lot more fun than I remembered. A new poster session had opened up, so I submitted an abstract. Here is a photo of the poster:

POSTER EDGELL PPT DRAFT APRIL 03 2017

The poster was very well received. I had a lot of traffic near my poster. Several people stopped by to ask me about it, and to take photos. I received more reaction with this Cultural Geography topic than I have ever had with any of my papers in Climatology.

DennisEdgellatAAGBoston2017
Some big fat guy stopped by.

Later, I developed this topic into a full paper presentation and PowerPoint slide show for the Southeastern Division of the Association of American Geographers (SEDAAG) in fall 2017.

What a conference — fly in day 1 evening, present day 2 morning, fly out day 3 morning.

http://www.aag.org/cs/annualmeeting/annual_meeting_highlights/2017_boston_highlights

Posted in CONFERENCE PRESENTATION, CULTURE, OLD RESEARCH

“Meteorology and Myth: Rationalization of the Thunderstorm and Tornado Deities of Japan” (SEDAAG, 2018).

The following is a paper I read to the 73rd Annual Meeting of the Southeastern Division of the Association of American Geographers, held November 19 to 20th. The conference was hosted by East Tennessee State University, at the Millenium Center in Johnson City, TN.

Slide1Slide3Slide4Slide5Slide6Slide7Slide8Slide9Slide10Slide11Slide12Slide13Slide14Slide15Slide16Slide17Slide18Slide19Slide20Slide21Slide22Slide23Slide24Slide25Slide26Slide27Slide28Slide29Slide30Slide31Slide32Slide33Slide34Slide35Slide36Slide37Slide38Slide39Slide40Slide41Slide42Slide43Slide44Slide45Slide46Slide47Slide48Slide49Slide50Slide51Slide52Slide53Slide54Slide55Slide56Slide57Slide58Slide59Slide60Slide61Slide62Slide63Slide64Slide65Slide66Slide67Slide68Slide69Slide70Slide71Slide72Slide73Slide74Slide75Slide76Slide77Slide78Slide79

Notice: These images are just JPEG files of my original PowerPoint. The Powerpoint had a lot of animated graphics that you miss out on here. Let me know if you want to see the original! — DE

Posted in CONFERENCE PRESENTATION, OLD RESEARCH

“LAND COVER AND LAND USE CHANGES IN THE MYSTERIOUS CAROLINA BAYS” presentation at SEDAAG 2008

This is the slide show presented at the 2008 Southeastern Division of the Association of American Geographers. Although I presented, and claimed co-authorship, the vast majority of this research was completed over a span of 25 years by Dr. Thomas E. Ross, now a Faculty Emeritus at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke.