Posted in CONFERENCE PRESENTATION, EDUCATION, MY PHOTOS, NORTH AMERICA

Posters seen at the Undergraduate Research Conference

The Pembroke Undergraduate Research and Creativity Symposium was held on Wednesday, April 10, 2019. This annual event is a celebration and recognition of undergraduate research, scholarship, creativity and entrepreneurship.  Faculty mentored their students on a wide variety of research projects. This included students involved in course-based undergraduate research experiences.

Here are some of the posters seen at the conference. Click to view full size JPEG files:

Was this undergraduate event a stepping stone to more Geographic research? Will these students develop their ideas further? Who wants to take their posters to the Southeastern Division of the American Association of Geographers? Does anyone want to go to the Applied Geography Conference? How about the North Carolina Geographical Society?

Contact me if interested!

 

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Posted in Climatology, CONFERENCE PRESENTATION, CULTURE, OLD RESEARCH

My Poster for the Library’s Annual Creativity Showcase!

My Poster for the Library’s Annual Creativity Showcase!

The media blurb from Library: “The Mary Livermore Library will be sponsoring the Third Annual UNCP Research and Creativity Showcase on April 15, 2019 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. This event will feature poster and speaker presentations at the newly-renovated Mary Livermore Library. These presentations will highlight the scholarship, research, and creative works of UNCP faculty and staff during the past year.”

Contact me if you want to learn more about my “Meteorology and Myth” project.

Notice: I have updated this article, originally posted on March 5, to include photos from the event on April 15, 2019. I also contributed another poster to the event “Blogging through the GEOG-ing” as per the TLC Directors request,

Next year my library showcase event poster will continue the Meteorology and Myth theme with a new chapter — “A Fair Candlemas”. See you then. 

Posted in Climatology, COLLABORATIONS, CONFERENCE PRESENTATION, MY PHOTOS, OLD RESEARCH

Posters seen at the Graduate Student Symposium and Open House April 1, 2019

No foolin’ !!! Last night was the Graduate School Symposium and Open House. Current graduate students, potential graduate students and their families enjoyed poster presentations, refreshments and opportunities to discuss our numerous graduate programs. There were a record number 69 posters submitted this year. I had four of my graduate students present posters.

 

You can find more information about the Graduate School linked here:

https://www.uncp.edu/academics/colleges-schools/graduate-school/professional-development/graduate-research-symposium

Just click on a poster to start the slideshow and see details.

The awards were announced after the event. Unfortunately none of my students won, but I still think that they are ALL WINNERS!

https://www.uncp.edu/academics/colleges-schools/graduate-school/professional-development/graduate-research-symposium

 

 

 

 

Posted in Climatology, COLLABORATIONS, CONFERENCE PRESENTATION

Seen at the North Carolina Academy of Science, March 22-23, 2019

Drink in hand, Dennis Edgell mentors graduate student Julian Butler at the North Carolina Academy of Science Annual Meeting, held at UNC Wilmington, March 22-23, 2019.

Seen at the North Carolina Academy of Science, March 22-23, 2019: Please enjoy this slide show!

You can view Julian’s abstract and poster in detail LINKED HERE.

https://mapleforestricepaddy.wordpress.com/2019/03/05/julian-butlers-poster-abstract-for-the-nc-academy-of-science-annual-meeting-2019/

Butler, Julian and Dennis. J. Edgell. “Palmer Drought Severity Index Tracking of Alternating Periods of Drought and Excess Moisture in Southeastern North Carolina 1895-2018.” North Carolina Academy of Science. University of North Carolina at Wilmington. March 21-22, 2019.

You can view my slide show presentation on the post LINKED HERE.

https://mapleforestricepaddy.wordpress.com/2019/03/05/north-carolina-academy-of-science-2019-science-education-meteorology-and-myth/

Dennis. J. Edgell. “Science Education, Meteorology and Myth: The Lightning and Wind Gods of Japan.”  North Carolina Academy of Science. University of North Carolina at Wilmington. March 21-22, 2019.

SEE YOU AGAIN NEXT YEAR!

Posted in Climatology, CONFERENCE PRESENTATION, CULTURE

North Carolina Academy of Science 2019 “Science Education, Meteorology and Myth”

FYI: The following is the abstract for my oral paper presentation at the upcoming North Carolina Academy of Science meeting to be held in Wilmington, NC March 22-23, 2019.

Science education, meteorology and myth: The lightning and wind gods of Japan.

This project derives from educational modules developed for teaching atmospheric science concepts to non-science, general education college students. Folklore and mythology are not proper history or science fact, however there may be persistent, underlying truths to the narrative themes inherent in folklore. Japan’s Shinto religion holds Raijin as a god of lightning and thunderstorms, and Fujin as the god of windstorms and tornadoes. There are rational, scientific reasons why the activities of these metaphysical sky deities persist into modern, secular Japanese culture. Although Raijin and Fujin were revered as “kami” or gods, they were depicted as demonic, destructive forces of nature in traditional Japanese art and architecture.  This educational project will explain the science analogies which can be used to explain the Shinto allegory in Japanese culture. Meteorological lessons were made to describe, or at least reinforce the mythology as depicted in Japan’s art, architecture and land use. Myths such as Raijin’s penchant for eating the navels of children, or why Fujin’s skin is green, can be used as discussion points to illustrate meteorological principles in an interesting way for non-science majors. For example, all Japanese painters of the Edo Period depicted lightning flashes as red in color, even though lightning clearly is not red. It might have been artistic license, or perhaps there are meteorological reasons as to why lightning was always colored that way. This teaching module explains weather phenomenon such as gust fronts, nitrogen fixation by lightning, the destructive east winds of cyclones, and others. Through the use of atmospheric science concepts in the context of art and mythology, it is hoped that arts and humanities students will come to better appreciate meteorology. Geoscience majors in turn, could have basic meteorological concepts reinforced, and also gain a better appreciation for art, history and culture.

Feel free to contact me for a copy of the full presentation or collaborative ideas.

Update! Here is a slide show gallery of my presentation.

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03/25/2019

Posted in Climatology, COLLABORATIONS, CONFERENCE PRESENTATION

Julian Butler’s Poster Abstract for the NC Academy of Science Annual Meeting 2019


Posted in BOOKS, Music, NORTH AMERICA, Popular Culture

“Ceiling Unlimited” song by Rush

Points and stops along the healing road.

Today’s post will be a cocktail mix of part meteorology, part song lyric analysis, and part cross-country geographic transect. How are these three things related? Well, I like to use transects when I teach Geography … and I sometimes listen to rock music when commuting … and I also like to clarify meteorological terminology when I can.

You may have seen a current local conditions status page on The Weather Channel. The meteorological and aviation term “ceilings” refers to the height of the lowest layer of the flat base of clouds.  If you are looking up, how high do you have to reach in order to touch the cloud base – or the “ceiling”? This is a height usually reported in feet above ground level. Modern meteorologists use a ceilometer, which measures the cloud base height with a laser.  What if there are no clouds in the sky? In that case, a number cannot be reported – and so the condition is listed as “ceiling unlimited”.

The term is also the title of a song by the Canadian rock band Rush, off of their 2002 comeback album “Vapor Trails”.

Vapor Trails 2002 album cover art
By Source, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=563789

Listen to the song via the YouTube video posting linked here.

Make sure to view the lyrics of the song in the link posted here.

Fans of Rush are well aware of the personal life tragedies which occurred to drummer and lyricist of the band, Neil Peart. In 1997, Mr. Peart’s nineteen-year old daughter Selena was killed in a horrific traffic accident. He and his wife Jackie were devastated by the loss. A year later, Neil’s wife also died — from cancer officially, but many felt that she had died of a broken heart, and willed herself to die because she could not deal with the pain of her daughter’s death. Band members Geddy Lee and Alex Lifeson agreed that Rush should go on hiatus, and possibly never continue. Neil Peart’s story of grief is told in the book “Ghost Rider: Travels on the Healing Road” (Amazon link here).

While still in a state of extreme grief, Neil suffered other indignities. His faithful family dog died soon after his wife, then his best friend was sent to prison for marijuana possession.  All alone with this own dangerous thoughts, Neil took off on a solo motorcycle ride across Canada.  A photo of his red BMW Touring Motorcycle, which was a gift from his wife during happier times, is seen in the photo gallery below. (Click an image to view full size.)

His first route (See Google Maps Route above), took him from his home in Quebec, across Ontario, and the Prairie Provinces, eventually crossing the Arctic Circle, then over the Canadian Rockies to British Columbia and Vancouver Island. He later continued riding south into the USA, down into Mexico and across to Belize.

Mr. Peart traveled approximately 50,000 miles, often riding 500 miles or longer each day. The lyrics he later wrote for the Rush album reflect his travels and feelings down this “healing road”.

The ghost rider with vapor trails overhead. A scene from the film documentary “Beyond The Lighted Stage”.

Riding a motorcycle through the wilds requires concentration, which helped to take his grieving mind away from his emotional pain. Mr. Peart himself drew the example of how infants can be calmed by taking a car ride. Riding across North America calmed his “baby soul”. The “Ghost Rider” book – written some time later — includes many of Mr. Peart’s observations about the physical terrain and culture. The lyrics intertwine with his mixed feelings of anger, resentment, thankfulness and humility. He kept a journal, which includes excerpts from letters and other supportive messages exchanged with his friends. The Rush movie documentary “Beyond The Lighted Stage” has a segment about Neil’s travel linked on this YouTube clip. Make sure to listen to Neil’s observation about travel at time 4:00.

His band mates thought that the group might not ever play together again, so Vapor Trails must be viewed as a “comeback” album for the group. (It was back to Rush heavy-metal basics (… and no keyboards were used!) The album title itself symbolizes the ephemeral nature of existence.  We live —  then soon we are gone — leaving only partial evidence of our lives. That trace will then also soon evaporate.  The record makes for some pretty good “motorcycle music” or for driving those long-distance geographic transects! The other songs also contain Zen-like travel philosophy. You can listen to the entire album, with on-screen lyrics here.

“Ceiling Unlimited” is probably my second or third favorite song on the album — the title coming from a Weather Channel forecast Neil happened to catch on one stop. When Mr. Peart’s experience is considered, these lyrics make perfect sense.

Lyrics are in bold italic, my vapid comments are in orange font.

It’s not the heat / It’s the inhumanity / Plugged into the sweat of a summer street / Machine gun images pass / Like malice through the looking glass

……….. Perhaps this is a grip about bad situations, and negative human interactions one might have when traveling. Neil was known for having a short-fuse and did not interact well with the public. Although Geddy and Alex relished meeting and interacting with Rush fans, Neil hated it. “Machine gun images” may allude to the rapid paced movement of objects coming into, and then out of vision very quickly on a fast moving motorcycle. It might also allude to his own dark thoughts.

The slackjaw gaze / Of true profanity / Feels more like surrender than defeat / If culture is the curse of the thinking class / If culture is the curse of the thinking class

………. Similarly, the “slack-jawed” insult may be reserved for the contempt he felt for ignorant people. I hope that he does not really have contempt for rural people. One will run into people with bad attitudes on a trip occasionally. Educated in the arts, and having an appreciation for literature as Mr. Peart is known for, I also know what a burden it is when you have knowledge of art or esoteric subjects, yet all of your daily interactions are with ignoramuses.

Ceiling unlimited / World so wide / Turn and turn again / Feeling unlimited / Still unsatisfied / Changes never end 

………. Could this be an awakening of some hopeful thoughts.  Now that his former life has been destroyed, is his future all open-sky? Unlimited in possibility? What would his wife and daughter have wanted for him?

The vacant laugh / Of true insanity / Dressed up in the mask of Tragedy / Programmed for the guts and glands / Of idle minds and idle hands

I rest my case – / Or at least my vanity / Dressed up in the mask of Comedy / If laughter is a straw for a drowning man / If laughter is a straw for a drowning man

………. Well, he had to set his luggage on the dressers in many small town hotels as he traveled. The shows and commercials he would see on his motel television would provide nothing useful. Likely, he would have to put on a false face of friendliness when interacting with locals. Being amused or acting friendly on occasion with a friendly clerk or waitress could not ease his pain, but perhaps it was all he had. 

Ceiling unlimited / Windows open wide / Look and look again / Feeling unlimited / Eyes on the prize / Changes never end

………. (Repeats from the chorus)  Perhaps he begins to heal a little, day in and day out. 

Winding like an ancient river / The time is now again / Hope is like an endless river / The time is now again

………. My favorite line is “the time is now again”. Because time in this situation does not matter. There is only the here and now. He had no destination. The natural environment, the river had been flowing and cutting its course for millennia. This may be the temporal version of the old country expression “no matter where you go, there you are.”

—————————————–

Songwriters: Alex Zivojinovich / Gary Lee Weinrib / Neil Elwood Peart.  Ceiling Unlimited lyrics © Ole Media Management Lp.

It took the sap four hours to flow … added up in total … over the course of one week. If you want to borrow my copy of “Ghost Rider” or “Vapor Trails” see me in my office today!

Posted in CULTURE, Popular Culture

Do American college students have something to learn from Japan’s “Coming of Age Day”?

Do American college students have something to learn from Japan’s “Coming of Age Day”?

The second Monday in January is a Japanese public holiday termed 成人の日 Seijin no Hi”. “Coming of Age Day” or “Adults Day” honors young people who have turned 20 years old since April 2 of last year, or will turn 20 by April 1 this year. Twenty-years old is termed the “age of majority” — meaning that the youth join all other adults in the larger society. Age 20 is also known as the “age of maturity”. The holiday is an important rite of passage for young people, and the tradition dates back centuries. The day is observed to congratulate and honor those young people who will accept the responsibilities of being an adult citizen. Certain legal rights are expanded at that age, but with that also comes with an expectation of increased responsibility.

https://tokyogirlsupdate.com/akb48-coming-of-age-ceremony-2015-20150134643.html

The legal age for drinking alcohol, smoking, signing a lease, getting a loan, or getting married without parental consent is 20 years old in Japan.  Japanese youth are expected to give up childish behavior, and commit to being a more serious adult. Ironically, as age 20 is also the official legal drinking age – thus many young people are welcomed into the adult majority by having their first (legal) drink of sake, and many become intoxicated in celebration. I think that most American college students would agree that the best way to demonstrate maturity and independence is to drink alcohol.

Two kimono-clad girls drink sake during a coming-of-age day ceremony in Tokyo. (Photo by Yamaguchi Haruyoshi/Corbis via Getty Images) https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/two-kimono-clad-girls-drink-sake-during-a-coming-of-age-day-news-photo/543775336

Seijin Shiki ( 成人式refers to the social celebration and observation of the youths’ commitment. This usually involves a ceremony at a Shinto shrine and/or commemoration at legal offices in local prefectures. The entertainment districts in Tokyo are filled with young people and their families. Even Tokyo Disneyland also hosts events.

Ikuta Shrine Kobe, Japan https://hyogojapan.com/coming-of-age-day-japan/

Notable is the formal wear the young people wear. A formal kimono is traditional for young women. These are termed a  furisode (a long-sleeved kimono for unmarried women). These are all strikingly beautiful garments. Most young women rent them for the ceremonies, as these formal kimonos may cost thousands of dollars each.

Kimonos are one of the more unique and interesting aspects about Japanese culture:

https://tokyogirlsupdate.com/2018-seijin-201801136771.html

Young men wear either Western-style formal attire or a traditional men’s kimono with hakama.  Some celebrants instead wear traditional (historical) Japanese dress. A recent trend has begun, where participants wear “cosplay” type attire, as some may choose to dress as a famous Japanese character. They perhaps “party hard” on this day, because from then on they will have to be a responsible adult.

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See more photos at   http://netachou.blog.jp/archives/27809156.html

Unfortunately, there are fewer participants every year, which is a reflection of Japan’s declining birth rates and its inverted population pyramid. There is also an attitude of rejection of the concept by some youth.  The idea of taking on more responsibility merely because of age is not something some agree with. Japan’s “age of maturity” is scheduled to be legally reduced from age 20 to 18 in the year 2022. Japan’s leaders hope that more young people will mature faster, get married sooner and start families at an earlier age.

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2017/03/25/national/social-issues/coming-age-japans-shifting-definition-adulthood/#.XD9PnVxKiUk

Do you think that a commitment to maturity would take hold among American youth? Why or why not? Is twenty years old the right age for American kids to accept responsibility? How about thirty? Please comment.

It took the sap about 3:00 to flow today.