Posted in Climatology, CONFERENCE PRESENTATION, EDUCATION

PREVIEW — “Meteorology and Myth — Part II: A Fair Candlemas”

Welcome QR Code readers! If you have scanned the QR Code on my poster, it has brought you here. I am still compiling my full presentation for the SouthEastern Division of the American Association of Geographers Conference, to be held November 24-25, 2019. This post is just a placeholder for the presentation and reference list TBA. In the meantime, enjoy this preview.

I will be continuing my “Meteorology and Myth” Weather-and-Climate Education series this fall with another project on weather lore, this time titled “Meteorology and Myth – Part II: A Fair Candlemas

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSEI teach an introductory course in “Weather and Climate”.  Whenever February 2nd rolls around, a student will  ask if the “Groundhog Day” predictions are true. I used to always answer “NO!” The presence or absence of sunshine on any one particular day can not be used to determine either a shortened or a prolonged winter. Punxsutawney Phil’s predictions are just folksy nonsense.

However, I got to thinking about it … and began to hypothesize that there may be a teaching opportunity in this legend. Although the Groundhog’s prediction does not make meteorological sense in the short term, perhaps there are long-term climatological averages about prolonged-winters and early-springs, which may have allowed the folklore to survive and diffuse.

The purpose of the overall project is to develop general education teaching modules which bridge topics in geography, atmospheric science, history, art, culture and folklore. Students in the arts and humanities often struggle with physical science. Equally, students in Geoscience and other STEM fields often need a greater appreciation for the arts and humanities. The intent is not to have students “prove” whether or not Groundhog Day predictions are true.  Instead, the  goal is for students to have a better understanding of atmospheric circulations, global teleconnections and weather patterns. Secondarily, students should have a better appreciation for folklore, history, culture and environment.

Look for more updates and embellishments in November!

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Posted in Climatology, COLLABORATIONS, CONFERENCE PRESENTATION, MY PHOTOS, OLD RESEARCH

Posters seen at the Graduate Student Symposium and Open House April 1, 2019

No foolin’ !!! Last night was the Graduate School Symposium and Open House. Current graduate students, potential graduate students and their families enjoyed poster presentations, refreshments and opportunities to discuss our numerous graduate programs. There were a record number 69 posters submitted this year. I had four of my graduate students present posters.

 

You can find more information about the Graduate School linked here:

https://www.uncp.edu/academics/colleges-schools/graduate-school/professional-development/graduate-research-symposium

Just click on a poster to start the slideshow and see details.

The awards were announced after the event. Unfortunately none of my students won, but I still think that they are ALL WINNERS!

https://www.uncp.edu/academics/colleges-schools/graduate-school/professional-development/graduate-research-symposium

 

 

 

 

Posted in Climatology, COLLABORATIONS, CONFERENCE PRESENTATION

Julian Butler’s Poster Abstract for the NC Academy of Science Annual Meeting 2019


Posted in COLLABORATIONS, CONFERENCE PRESENTATION, MY PHOTOS, OLD RESEARCH

Seen at the North Carolina Academy of Science! (The Annual Meeting, March 23-24, 2018. Wake Tech Community College.)

Seen at the North Carolina Academy of Science! (The Annual Meeting, April 2018. Wake Tech Community College).

dennis edgell and julian butler NCAS Meeting 2018
It turns out that “Degree-Days” are neither “degrees” or “days”!

Dennis Edgell (L) and Julian Butler (R).

Dr. Farley and his students NCAS 2018
Dr. Farley would rather “bee keeping”

Dr. Farley and some of his “Kids in the Garden” research.

the big screen IMG_0178

Turned out the entire academy March 24 2018

I also presented a degree-day paper, expanding upon Julian’s pilot study.

I thought it would be attended only by the other presenters. Who knew that the entire academy would be there?

 

Posted in Climatology, CONFERENCE PRESENTATION, MY PHOTOS, OLD RESEARCH

“Spline Plots for Time Series Visualization of Annual Heating and Cooling Degree-Day Totals in the Climate Divisions of North Carolina.” AGC 2018

This is a poster I presented at the Applied Geography Conference held October 30-November 2, 2018, at my old alma materKent State University.

This was a wonderful trip! I had not been in Kent for almost 20 years. So much has changed … What ever happened to JB’s Down?

DE at AGC in KSU OCT 2018 IMG_0313

The Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center is a wonderful place. The whole downtown Kent area has been transformed in the past few years. Also, I could believe all the new buildings that have been erected on campus.

It was another successful Applied Geography Conference. Much thanks to Dr. Jay Lee, the AGC Director for many years.

some of the current Kent State climatologists at AGC 2018

This is a group photo of current Kent State University Climatology faculty and graduate students.  Oddly absent in the above photo however … is my dissertation adviser Dr. Thomas Schmidlin. Fortunately, I was able to catch up with him at lunch the next day and at the conference keynote address.

Also notable: While I was in Kent I visited Ray’s Place. My friend Bob  (also an old KSU room mate), was kind enough to buy me a late lunch.  I had the “Mofo Burger“.

Mo Fo Burger RAYS PLACE in Kent IMG_0323

Look for me at the next Applied Geography Conference to be held in Charlotte, NC October 2019.

Update: The YouTube video blogger Joe from “Our Earth” provided this introduction to the conference.

Oh man, it rained every day of the conference. I was hoping to get a better look at all the new features of KSU. I still had a great time, but there was never a good day for walking around.

The Sun came out the morning after the conference was over and I was checking out.