Posted in Climatology, CONFERENCE PRESENTATION, EDUCATION

A SPRITE IDEA

Welcome QR Code readers! This post is just a placeholder for another project in my Meteorology and Myth Science Education Series. This new project is titled “The Elusive and Ephemeral Sprites”.

Look for more updates and a re-post when I finish the poster presentation.

In the meantime, if you want to see a good introduction to Lightning Sprite research, please see the YouTube playlist below!

 

… what a sprite idea!

Posted in CONFERENCE PRESENTATION, CULTURE, EDUCATION

Art, Allegory and Geographic Education: Cultural and Meteorological Lessons from the Sky Deities of Japan

10-21-2019: This is an update and repost from May of this year. Please check out the YouTube video above. If you go to YouTube, put a “like” or comment if you have a question or compliment!  I will be presenting more about my investigation into the sky deities of Japan at the Applied Geography Conference in October. This presentation grew out of my “Meteorology and Myth” research. The abstract for my presentation: “Art, Allegory and Geographic Education: Cultural and Meteorological Lessons from the Sky Deities of Japan” has been accepted for a special session on Physical Geography. Here is a sample slide:

The following is a slideshow of some of the artwork to be discussed, TBD

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Credit goes to the original artists. No copyright infringement is intended. See the full presentation for all credits and references, TBD.

This year’s AGC will be held in Charlotte, NC October 23-25. See the link here for more information about the conference,

http://www.appgeogconf.org/

LINKS AND REFERENCES FOR ART AND IMAGES PDF HERE:

SUGGESTED REFERENCES AND LINKS FOR ART AND IMAGES

and more art …

More Refs and Links

Posted in Climatology, CONFERENCE PRESENTATION, CULTURE, EDUCATION, Uncategorized

References and Links for — “Meteorology and Myth Part 3: Krishna’s Monsoon Swing”

Welcome QR code readers! If you scanned the code from my poster, then it brought you here. You are still slightly early. In fact, I’m really not ready. I am still compiling that list of references you are looking for.

This blog post is merely a place holder for an abstract and references for a poster/paper yet to be fully written. I will add to the art gallery and reference list as I go along.

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BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: I teach a general education “Weather and Climate” course. Understanding the circulation of the atmosphere can be a difficult topic for introductory students. However, Earth’s wind systems largely explain climate – and climate explains the world. The purpose of my ongoing “Meteorology and Myth” project is to develop teaching modules which present concepts in an interesting way. Students in the arts and humanities often struggle with physical science. Equally, students in geoscience or STEM fields often need a greater appreciation of the arts and humanities.

This story of monsoons is made to bridge topics in geography, environment and atmospheric science, with history, art, folklore and culture. Teachable moments, discussion and debate is encouraged.

Update! I have created a poster version of the topic. I just now need to find the correct market for it. If you have suggestions, please post in the comments.

References:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monsoon_of_South_Asia

https://www.learnreligions.com/jhulan-yatra-1770179

https://www.pnnl.gov/science/highlights/highlight.asp?id=5037

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/290456099_Impact_of_Madden-Julian_oscillation_on_onset_of_summer_monsoon_over_India

https://www.thehindu.com/society/history-and-culture/the-meaning-of-monsoon-clouds/article24410293.ece

Video: World of Discovery “Chasing India’s Monsoon”

Posted in Climatology, COLLABORATIONS, CONFERENCE PRESENTATION

Julian Butler’s Poster Abstract for the NC Academy of Science Annual Meeting 2019


Posted in CONFERENCE PRESENTATION, CULTURE, OLD RESEARCH

“Meteorology and Myth: Rationalization of the Thunderstorm and Tornado Deities of Japan” (SEDAAG, 2018).

The following is a paper I read to the 73rd Annual Meeting of the Southeastern Division of the Association of American Geographers, held November 19 to 20th. The conference was hosted by East Tennessee State University, at the Millenium Center in Johnson City, TN.

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Notice: These images are just JPEG files of my original PowerPoint. The Powerpoint had a lot of animated graphics that you miss out on here. Let me know if you want to see the original! — DE