Posted in Climatology, CONFERENCE PRESENTATION, EDUCATION

PREVIEW — “Meteorology and Myth — Part II: A Fair Candlemas”

Welcome QR Code readers! If you have scanned the QR Code on my poster, it has brought you here. I am still compiling my full presentation for the SouthEastern Division of the American Association of Geographers Conference, to be held November 24-25, 2019. This post is just a placeholder for the presentation and reference list TBA. In the meantime, enjoy this preview.

I will be continuing my “Meteorology and Myth” Weather-and-Climate Education series this fall with another project on weather lore, this time titled “Meteorology and Myth – Part II: A Fair Candlemas

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSEI teach an introductory course in “Weather and Climate”.  Whenever February 2nd rolls around, a student will  ask if the “Groundhog Day” predictions are true. I used to always answer “NO!” The presence or absence of sunshine on any one particular day can not be used to determine either a shortened or a prolonged winter. Punxsutawney Phil’s predictions are just folksy nonsense.

However, I got to thinking about it … and began to hypothesize that there may be a teaching opportunity in this legend. Although the Groundhog’s prediction does not make meteorological sense in the short term, perhaps there are long-term climatological averages about prolonged-winters and early-springs, which may have allowed the folklore to survive and diffuse.

The purpose of the overall project is to develop general education teaching modules which bridge topics in geography, atmospheric science, history, art, culture and folklore. Students in the arts and humanities often struggle with physical science. Equally, students in Geoscience and other STEM fields often need a greater appreciation for the arts and humanities. The intent is not to have students “prove” whether or not Groundhog Day predictions are true.  Instead, the  goal is for students to have a better understanding of atmospheric circulations, global teleconnections and weather patterns. Secondarily, students should have a better appreciation for folklore, history, culture and environment.

Look for more updates and embellishments in November!

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Posted in MY PHOTOS, OLD RESEARCH, Uncategorized

My entry for the American Meteorological Society T-Shirt design contest 2018

Spoiler Alert: It didn’t win.  I had entered the American Meteorological Society’s annual “T-Shirt Design Contest” last summer. The winner was to be awarded free registration to the Annual Meeting of the AMS that is being held this month. They will  also be selling the shirts — of the winner — at the conference. Here is my design, although I never made it into a real fabric shirt.

I would like to tell you a little bit about how I came to make this design. The t-shirt I designed is just a plain white shirt with black text.  I suppose it could be made in color, but for the purposes of the contest, I just wanted the image to be as clear as possible for the judges.

How did I come up with the idea? I came up with the design from two different ideas. 1) I thought of the National Weather Service map symbols used on the station model on a synoptic weather chart. 2) I also have an interest in Japanese culture and art. (See my current work on Meteorology and Myth.)  The shirt depicts the Japanese kanji for “thunderstorm”.* The Japanese word is raiu.

Background: Kanji symbols are one of the three (maybe four?) methods of writing the Japanese language. There are thousands of kanji symbols. This system differs from our letters in that kanji is a symbolic — or logographic — system. The symbols (or “words” if you will) look like the real things the words represent.

The symbol on the left combines characters for “lightning” on top, with the symbol for “rice field” on the bottom. When the symbol is placed in this context, the symbol no longer means rice field — instead it   means “drumming”.  This is very appropriate! Thunder can sound like the pounding of drums as a thunderstorm approaches the observer. The symbol on the right is the kanji character for “rain”.  Note the symbol includes those four dashes which look rather like rain falling from the flat base of a cloud.  Maybe on to a rice field?

From “The Rising Sky” blog on WordPress.

When you put them together, it “spells” (cough) the Japanese word Raiu – or Thunderstorm. Link: Here is how to pronounce the word “Raiu”.

The other inspiration for my T-shirt design was based on the US National Weather Service symbols used on their synoptic weather charts. Meteorologists place these symbols on a map around a particular station, to represent conditions at a point in time.

Notice that the NWS symbols for thunderstorm, and the various conditions associated with types of thunderstorms storms look like logographic writing.  The basic thunderstorm shorthand symbol is a horizontal line with a perpendicular straight line down on the left side, and a zig-zag line with arrow on the right.  The zig-zag obviously represents a downward lightning path. Perhaps the left line represents the downward rush of rain and cold air, typical of a mature thunderstorm.

Actually, I had thought at first of just using the NWS thunderstorm symbol as the T-shirt design, but then thought the kanji script might be a good conversation starter.  I hope you like my design. Maybe someday I could have the shirt printed out. Do you have any suggestions as to how I might improve the design? Please comment if you want us to order some!

It took the sap about 2:05 to flow through this one.

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*References: I found a WordPress blogger who has posted articles about Japanese kanji script. He also posts interesting articles about Japanese culture. I defer to his expertise here.

https://therisingsky.wordpress.com/2013/09/05/kanji-tip-15-%E9%9B%B7%E9%9B%A8-thunderstorm/

Weather map symbols:

https://www.joshtimlin.com/learning-center?lightbox=dataItem-irgddmlj

https://www.thoughtco.com/symbols-on-weather-maps-3444369

 

Posted in CONFERENCE PRESENTATION, CULTURE, OLD RESEARCH

“Meteorology and Myth: Rationalization of the Thunderstorm and Tornado Deities of Japan” (SEDAAG, 2018).

The following is a paper I read to the 73rd Annual Meeting of the Southeastern Division of the Association of American Geographers, held November 19 to 20th. The conference was hosted by East Tennessee State University, at the Millenium Center in Johnson City, TN.

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Notice: These images are just JPEG files of my original PowerPoint. The Powerpoint had a lot of animated graphics that you miss out on here. Let me know if you want to see the original! — DE